Newspaper Archive of
The Woodville Republican
Woodville, Mississippi
Lyft
December 3, 1898     The Woodville Republican
PAGE 1     (1 of 4 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 4 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 3, 1898
 

Newspaper Archive of The Woodville Republican produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




i; VOI,. LXXIII. II I DOINGS OFAWEEK What Has Happened ]tlr0ugh0ut the Civilized WoHd. A WEEK&apos;S NEWS CONDENSED A Complete Review of the IIaplnings of the Past Seven Days in This and All Foreign Lands. GIYF21 IN TIIE PRESS DISPATCIIES %]'A It NE YVS. In Paris the American peace commis- sioners delivered to the Spanish com- xnissiones the final terms of the United States. They demand the cession of he entire Philippine archipelago, offer Spain an indemnity of $20,000,000 foT her pacific expenditures in the islands, and require that an answer be, given not latea- than lhe 28th inst. On the steamer San Augusne the ashes of Christopher Columbus left H.a- ana for Spain. The preMdent has decided that the Stnish ordnance captured by the American army and navy shall be di- vided between the two branches of the service. Acable message from Gen. Otis at Iani]a announces the arrival of the "transport Vigilancia with all well on board. The stenmer 12ratten left Savannah with 700 tons of provisions for the starv- ing people of C uba. With 700 cavalry Gem Carpenter took possession of Porto Principe. Tim city was formally surrendered to him by 3em March, the Spanish commander. A note from the Slmnish evacuation commissioners says that it will be pos- sible to turn the city over to the mill. tary authorities of lhe United States !)5," Deeeanber 20. Adxiccs were received in 5Iadrid tbat Gen. ios. governor of the Visays is- laIds, had been killed by the insurgen,ts at Iloilo. The complete returns show that in the Santiago campaign 267 Americans were killed and 1.438 wounded. In tIrana |be members of the olonal oabinet tendered their resig- nations to Gen. Blanco. Advices from Madrid say that the cabinet has authorized Senor Montero IR, ios to sign the treaiy of peace. FRO]I IV AItIIN{TON. A new counterfeit five-dollar legal ?ender note, series of 188, check leer A; J. Fount Till.man, rtg.ister; D. N, Morgan, treasurer, has made itsappear- once. ]u his annual report Willis L. Moore chfef of the weaiher bureau, says over 23,000,000 forecasts were dstributed fluringthe .)'ear. exclusive of those print- ed in the daily papers. George E. Iobcrts, director of the rain,t, in his annual report, says the gold eainage of the world in 1897 u,as the lrget recorded, amounting to $437.- 719242, ,against $195.$99,517 in 1896. Throughout the country Thank's'iv- lng day a,s very generally observed. In his annual report Capt. Cvownin- shield, chief of the bure,au of naviga- tion, navy department, a-ecommends that congress authorize the increase of the nxal force to 20.600 men for gen- eral service and 2.500 apprentices. In his annml report Secretary Bliss. of tile interior department, recom- mends that Alaska be allowed repre- sentation in congres,s. He also says that the total number of school pupila In the country is 16.255.093. In bls unnal report First. Asistanl lstmaer General Pem'y S. Heath says the general business of lhe depsrt- raen has increased over $6,0,000 dur. lag the fiscal year. TIlE EAST. In the United States the visible sup- ply of grain on the 21st was: Wheat l,392.000,bushcls ; corn, 2,3,238.000 bush- els; oats, 5.756,000 bushels; rye, 1,D21,- 000 bushels; barley, 3,784,000 bushels, In Philadelphia Senator M. S. Quay, . tL Quay, his son, aud ex-State Treas- ]rer ttaywood weTe indicted for con- pirey in cenection with an alle'ed misuse of state funds. The famous pacer, Star Pointer, with 4'h:9,d's record of 1:59 A for a mile, ew York to W. J. White. of Cia:;,l, 0,, for $15,000. ia the pork packing establisb- t of John P. Squire & Co. at East Cambridge, ,',lass.. injured 11 men and caused a propery loss of $100.000. On the charge of embezzling $115,008 C. Kequgh, formerly tax collector in Holyoke. Mass., was arrested. In NewA'ork city the prize fight be- tween James J. Corbett and Thomas harkey ended in a fiasco, the latter be- ing awarded the fight on a foul. Rear Admiral Joseph N. Miller has been placed on the retired list. In a fit of jealousy William Mtller. f Honesdalc, Pa., shot and killed his wife and ten too,k his own life. A bill passed the Vcrmonlegislature compelling state attorneys, sheriffs and municipal judges to enforce the pr(hb- law, nnder heavy penalty. fl'he president of Cassia Rico, Rafael Iglesias. arrived in New York. ]VEST AND SOUTH. On the property of thRiverside Iron company at Steubenville. O., gold has been discovered. By the.falling of a scaffold feur men were killed at the electric power house at Covington, Ky. Ex-Queen Liliuokalani of Hawaii at- ived in San Francisco. In the cotton mills at Augusta, Ga., .000 operators struck on account of a reduction in vager Pans. Ill., has been placed undermar- tiat law. On a slr&t in Chicago A. Quimby, a i: ;sl hess man'0f'Da Metrics, la., + WOODVILLE, MISS., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1898. I I I III II I I II II - _ i IIIl|l I i I I II I I I MISSISSIPPI MATTERS. Vote on Constitutional AlneudUlent. OFFICE ,ECnETA'IV OF STATE, The following t3 the official vote for and against the amendment to Section 232 of the Sate ConstituSon at the gen- eral election held ove]a.ber 8, 1898: Counties. Yea. Nay. Adams ............................. ;;45 18 A[eora ............................... 163 52 Amite ................................ 195 79 Atl ala .................................. 1 ;0 31'5 Benton .................................. 79 177 l)oliva r ................................. 2"5 9 Lalhoila ............................ 15 93 t'arrott ................................. 247 3:( (hickas:lw. ........................... 2'2(; 108 ('hoctaw. ............................. 157 173 Cl'|lborne ........................... 1-13 11 Clarke .................................. 19 70 Clay ................................. 214 76 CO|IOHla ............................... 174 ?{', ('apish ................................ 233 41 ('ov|llgtoa ........................... 65 43 DeSoto .................................. 136 112 Fr;lllklla ............................ 61 12 Greene ................................. 37 3 Grenada ................................ 132 2 liancork ............................. 14" 24 Harrison ............................... 27 24 II|nds ................................. 604 112 llolmes ............................... 292 81 lssaqllea;| .............................. 103 5 I ta wllnll):t ............................... ]49 48 JaF.s)a ................................. 4ZI- 6 Jasper. ................................. IS2 107 delerson ............................. 146 15 Jol)eS ................................ 18:1 30 Kelnper. ............................... 175 48 I.afayeHe ............................. 201 47 l,a nderdale .............................. 4t4 89 Lawrence ............................ 15(} 62 Leake ................................. 194 160 Lee ................................... 193 117 Leflore ............................... 2oo 4 l,hleolB ............................... 1':1 19 LowIldCS ................................ 197 77 Madison ................................. 16 56 lal'|Oll ............................... 159 54 Marshal! .............................. 2:}l (.9 Monroe .................................. 2t6 Sl Montgolaery ............................ lS6 99 Neshoba ............................... 169 101 ewloa ........................ .,. 258 F Noxubee ........ 214 44 ()ktibbeha ........................... 9" 110 Pallola .................................. 109 4 l'earl-ltlver ........................ 75 Perry ................................. 139 2 Pike .................................... 473 ( Pontotoc ................................ 209 61 t'r, miss .............................. 160 7( Qtlllmaa ................... .......... 58 5 ltl|llkin ................................ 2:+I '291 ,',:OI t .................................. 9$ S8 Sh;,rKey. .............................. 9i 4 S',qlIII)SO n 151 lJ SP, lil h ................................. IS8 nil Suntlower .......................... 90 l TaBaha'eh:e ............................ n}z 2 Tale ................................... 74 159 'l'il)Pah ................................ 36 363 "llsll olai I|go ............................. lgl 25 Ttlllie.t ........................... 133 14 15111011 ................................... 153 112 Val l't* ................................ 585 15 Washington ............................ 41 (i Wayne ................................ 133 12 Webster ............................... 1(}8 109 W[Ikillsoa ............................. 179 48 VIIIS[OII ............................... 152 104 Ya|o)llSha ............................ 207 43 Yazoo .................................. 420 13! Total ............................. 14,516 5,321 Maj-rity for amendmeat ..................... 9,19b The section as amended reads as fol- lows: See. 232. The commissioners of said levee districts shall have supervision of the erection, repair and mainteaanec of the levees in their respective dis- tricts, 'and shall have power to cedo all their rights of way and levees and the maintenance, management and con- trol thereof to the gocernmcnt of the United States.'" The amendment consisting of the words quoted. J. L. l)ow, Secretary of State. State Industrial Exposition. The Mississippi press is agitating a big State industrial exposition to be held in 1900. The scheme is to 'et each county to work up n,n exhibit of its own nesources and unite in making the exposition complete in every particu- lar. Committees are to be appointed and efforts made to get the rilroads to oo-operate so as to run cheap immigra- ,ion excursions from the North and West. The legislature is to be asked also for a liberal appropriation, Blind Tigers Raided. After employing an expert detective for several days and making the proper locations, a number of business men. accompanied by officers and ministers, raided the blind tigers and gmbling houses of West Point last week and Pade a very creditable catch. The movement was backed by many of the wealthiest and best people of the city. The spectacular parade of the crusaders caased considerable interest, anxiety and amusement. Banks Pay llack Taxes. The various State banks are settling" np with the revenue agent for back taxes due under the recent decision of the supreme court declaring the legis- lative exemption of solvent securities unconstitutional. The five Vicksburg banks have paid over sums aggregating '8,708. All the other State banks ara expected to settle promptly without further litigation. Army Promotions. The governor has commissioned , I. McGantz as secoud Heuteuaut of Com- pany I, First Regiment, to fill the va- cancy caused by the promotion of Lieut. Jacobsen. The governor has also commissioned B. A. Pope as second lieutenant of Company A, Third Missis- sippi, Mr. Pope having been elected by the company to fill the vacancy caused by the promotion of Lieut. Edgar Gwin to succeed First Lieut. W.C. George, resigned. Rev. L. H. KLmmons Dead. Rev. L. lI. Kimmons died at Oxford last week at the residence of his brother, after a lingering illness of several months. Mr. Kimmons was a Presby- tcrian preacher, and went to Oxford from Virgil Rankin county, to recu- perate. IIe was _6 years old. Distribution oT the Morrill ]Fund. # # The .rustees o+ the Aleorn Agrieul- rural and Mechanical college have flied their application for the portion of the Mc, rrill fund allotted to that institution. This fund is distributed monthly to the agrieultural colle'es of the coun try on a basis of the number of educable chil- dren. Mississippi gets $:,)4,000. The Alcorn college for neKroes gets $13,000, all told, and the StarkviIle college for whites gets $I1,000. This fund is a government appropriation which was to be increased each year until the share df each State ahould be 5,000, A THREATENED STORM. Flfforous Protest Agaiast the Quartrln of Cul:aa Troops at Llttlo Rock- Grounds of )bj vtioa. Little Reek. Ark.. Nov. 2S.=-Lie t. J. W. l'lfilli!)ps, comInandant at Fort Logan tl. l,'oot received a telegram last night from the war departmen notifying him that a detachment from the Twenty-fifth infantry would be sent to this station to do garrison duty. This informatiou has created a sensation among citizens generally, and eaused a stir which threatens to develop into a storm. The trouble is on account of 1he fact that the zoldiers designated for duty here are negroes, and beyond a doubt a strong protest will be entered with the war department by the state authorities and citizens against the occupation of the post by colored troops. The protest will not bc based entirely upon hostility to the negro, but on the feeling prevailing in view of the recent troublesat south- ern camps against placing negroes in a position where clashes with the whites are like]), o occur. Gay. Jones. in speaking of the matter last night, said that he considered the sending of the negro troops here au exceedingly unvise thing to do, and deelared it,at he would cerfainly remonstrato with the federal authori- ties and orotest against it to the war del)arllncnt. WENT THROUGH A BRIDGE. One M'tn Killed, One Fttally and Oue Se- riously Injured--Cars ]Vrecked and Cttle Killed. I{oanoke. Va., Nov. 2S.--A north- bound fasl freight on the Shenaudoih division of the Norfolk &Western rail- way went tbrongh a bridgenear River- side. 57 miles norlh of Roanoke. yes- terday. Fireman Joseph Stevens was instautly killed. Brakeman ])avid Winger fatally injvred and Engineer Stephen Mayo seriously scalded by es- caping steam. The men live in Roan- eke. The bridge was under construe tiou at the time of lhe accident, and il is reportcd that several of thc bridge workers were more or less iujnred. One span of the strncture p,'ave way preeipitatin, part of the train to the water below, a distance of 30 feet. The train was loadedwith live stock. vnd some of the cars were demolished. killing a considerable number of the cattle. A wrecking crew with sur- geons was sent from Roanoke to the scene of 1he accident. A DESPERATE NEGRO. Convicted of Oae 5Iurder, lie Shoots and Kills w Deputy Who Attempted ltis Recapture. Birminglmm, Ala., Nov. 28.--Chief Delm,y Johu ,Varnoek. of this city, was shot and killed here yesterday by VVilliam Goldston. a negro. Goldston iS a murderer sent up for life from Autaga eounly, and recently eseaped from a convict camp in that county. Vfarnock. learning of his presence in Birnfingham, attempted to arrest bim. but received three balls from a revolver in the hands of Goldston, who was behind a door. The convict es- caped, and, although the town turned out to huut him, he hd not been found np to midnight. If he is cap- t,rcd lynching is sure to follow. Warnoek was very po]mlar and known all over lhc state. ]te ran for nmyor of ]irmingham lasi year and 12 years ago was a democratic leader in state politics. THE SCHOONER IDEA SUNK, Tho Crew tIIsalug, and It Is Feared They YYent Down with the Veel. Green Bay, Wis.. Nov. 2S.--The schooner Idea lies near J.ong Tail Point light sunk in about ten feet of ater. tter bow is just out, aud it is snpposed :he is a complete loss. The crew of the vessel is mtssing, aud it i feared they went down with her. Yes- terday Capt. Theodore l)ennesse of the tug Johu Dennesse. while mak- ing an observation, saw the Idea fly- ing the flag of distress. The tug" went out to her and found her deserted. Her anchor had been east. but other- wise everything above water was in shipshape. The yawl boat, was in its place. Cant. Nels Zink, of Green Bay, owner of the boat. was sailing her. A rescuing party will seareb for tbe crew early in the morning. FRIGHTFUL BOILER EXPLOSION Eastern Long Island Cut Off From Communication with New York City by Heavy Snows. TRAINS STUGK i THE SNOWORIFTS, The Storm Felt Far Out at Sea by [aolmlng Steamers-Iany Craft Wrecked on the t'uast, Thirty-Five In alld Noar Boston llarbor Aloa--Twenty or Thirty Ltve Believed to be Lost. New York, Nov. 28. Points in east- ern Long Island which have been cut off from railroad communication with this city since Saturday's sorm, are still without train serviee, and the present prospect is that the tracks will not be cleared until Tuesday. The towns in Suffolk county, east of Baby- lon, have had no train service since Friday evening. The Montauk line at the Long Island railroad is open to Bab Slon. From Babylon to Green- port, a distance of about 50 miles, no train is runnfng, and none is prom- ised by the railroad before night, at the earliest. Trains Stuck In Drift. There are two trains stuck in snow drifts. Both were east-bound, and were caught on Saturday night. One is on the Montauk division, between Bay Shore and lslep. The other is on the main line. and was last heard of a Farmingdale. There were but few passengers in the trains, and the railroad officials had them cared for in hotels. The railroad cuts about the Shinne- cock hills are reported to have ten feet of snow in them. The Storm Felt Far Oat at Sea. The storm was felt far out at sea. Many of the regular liners and steam- ers which were due early Sunday morning failed to arrive on time, be- ing obliged to keep at sea until the storm abated. Tlic French liner La Touraine, first encountered the storm November 25, but came along steadily until the night of the 26th, when the snow and wind became so blinding that at a distance of 70 miles froni port the vessel was slowed down and barely held her way. This was con- tiued nntil, at 5:15 p. m., the vesel was anchored outside the bar. Other Vessels Caught It. The Furnesia had the gale, as did also lhe Thingvalla; lhe latter re= ported the strength of the gale aa 12, the highest he Beaufort scale gives. Both, however, came along without any difficulty, as they were ruuning sear the end of the storm. Trains from the west on all the lines entering Jersey City are from one to three hours late. This is true of the Pennsylvania road. the Lehigh Valley, the Baltimore & Ohio and the Erie, A Train Twenty-live llour L.,tte. The train from Bostou by the New York, New Haven & Hartford rail- road. due here at+ 6 a. m., Sunday, reached the Grand Central depot 25 hours late. The passengers suffered reatly from cold and hunger. A small one top-mast schooner is sunk just east of Barker's Bluff, aug lsland. She is close in shore nd welt out of water at low tide, but lls at high tide. Ihlrty-Five Wrecks inandAround Boston Harbor. Boston, Nov. 28.--Tugs returning to thts city at noon after a tour of the harbor report about 35 vessels of all izes ashore or sunk in and near Bos- ton harbor. Seven large schooners and two Bal- timore coal barges are completely wrecked and it is estimated that be- tween 25 and 30 lives have been lost. 0nly one body has yet been recovered. Vessels Rcporte d A sh er - ( ],   t aft. Washington, Nov. 28. Chief Kim- ball of the life-saving service has re- ceived a telegram stating that the schooner Ivey Bell from Boston to Bristol, is stranded near Jerry's Point, N. H. The crew of four was saved by the life-saving crew. The vessel is said to be a total less. Another telegram -states that the British brig Champion and the schooner C. J. Willard are ashore in Quaddy,bay, Me. The Champion will be a total loss. The crews are safe. Nine Vessels Lost at Gloucester. Mass. Gloucester. Mass., Nov. 28.--Nine vessels were lost in the blizzard at this port, but nohihg eould be learned aa to the loss of life. It is believed that the crews of nearly all the craft Three Persons Instantly Killed--Two Slncu escaped. Dead aud Others Fatitlly Injured --All Scslded. Stockton, Cal., Nov. 28. The steam drum of the boiler of the river passen- ger steamer T. C. Walker. en route from San Francisco to tilts city, ex- ploded yesterday while 14 miles dis- ta.t from Stockton. Three pers9as were instantly killed, namely, Capt. Tulan, Engineer Henry and a passen- ger named W. A. Downs, all being scalded, l'wo others, Mrs. Henry and Jerry Daily, died subsequently, and a sixth. Ferqando Law. will not live through he night. Of the scalded probably two others will not survive. Gcn. Kltehener Honored. London. Nov. 7,7. At Cambridge, Thursday, Gen. Kitchener was nc- corded s great reception when he re- ceived the freedom of .the borongh and was admitted to the degree of doctor of laws, which was the occa- sion for an outburst of time honored rollicking undcr graduate spirit. Iteeclver A0[olnt ed. New York, Nov. 28.--A receiver has been appointed for the Chelsea Paper Manufacturing Co., of Nomvieh, Conn., whose capital is $200,000f liabilities, daa. $75,000; nomiual usets+ Nearly all of the vessels least their fishermen. A BIG COAL CONTRACT. Being Mude at Cut ]gate, It May be th ]Fororunner of Another Extnslve lIlu ers' trlkc. Chicago, Nov. 28.--A Pittsburgh spe- cial says: James J. Hill, president of the Great orthern, has made a con- tract with "West Virginia coal opera- tors for 500,000 tons of coal, to be de- livered during 1899. ]t is to be deliv- ered at Sandnsky (O.) docks for $1.2 per ton. This is 25 cents below the price at which the operators of t be Pittsburgh district could furnish it, and may 9pen the miners' scales again and lead to strikes in Pennsylvania, ]ltinols and Indiana. President Hill, in reply to a telegram, says: "This company does not publish its purchas of coal or other materials." Settled Satisfactorily, Millville, N. J., Nov.28.--Jt is learned from a reliablc source that the gev- auces of the striking glass workers o T. C. Wheaton & Co.'s plant have been settled satisfactorily, and that all the men wll ! be baclfat work in a "few +T.+.W+,,+++ ,o+ IH[Y IgV[D Fire at ,la%per City, Me., destroyed eight business houses. At Burlin.lon, la., 1)eopl are cross- ing the river ou the ice. The Oliver oat meal mills at Joliet. Ill., were burned to the ground. ]'trlow Allen, of Memphis. Mo.. was fonnd dead in bed; cause unknown. The lave Stock exchage building in South St. Joseph, Me.. was consumed by fire. A freight train crashed through a bridge near Riverside, Va, Two men were killed. An Antwer 1) newspaper states that Connt Esterhazy has sailed for the United States. A storm of exceptional violence is sweeping over southern France and northern Italy. The output of lead and zinc this year in the Jplin (Mo.) district is described as the greatest on record. At Leroy, Ill., a brakeman was knocked from his car by an elevator post, and his neck hroken. Norman A. Spiers. of St. Louis, dropped dead of heart dlsease in New York city, Satnrday night. The steamer Walker's boiler explod- ed near Stockton, Cat.. and killed six people. Many others were injured. The sultau of Tnrkey has granted the American minister's request to is- sue traveling permits to missionaries. It is said in Catimlic circles at Wash- ington that Cardinal Gibbons will live part of the year in the national cap- ital. Dr. Lyman Abbott has announced that he will resign the pastorate of the Plymouth Congregational church, Brooklyn. Mrs. Emma Guhl, of Belleville, Ill,, poured culd water iu her husband' slippers. (;nhl struck her. and now she threatens to sue for divoree. Premier Dnpuy ha-: refused to post- poue the court-martial of (%1. l'ic- quart until after the couri of cassation Lad passed on the Drcyfus case. In his forthcoming message, the president will present a statement re- arding the moral obligations of the United States in the Philippines. A movement on the part of Royal Areanum couneils of the nation to give Admiral Schley a sword has re- cently been started in New York. The vetran actor. Charles W, Conl- dock. died in,New York city, Sum]ay, of drops)'. IIe was born in London in 1815. and began his stage career at 21. New England was I)Iockaded by a blizzard Sunday. ]ai] and wire serv- ice was demoralized by drifiing snow: and there were mauy maratimecasual- ties. Joseph Lanff, aged 17. lost his life. Sunday, at St. Louis. while endeavor- ing to rescue his ehum. August Ax- thela, from drowning. Axtheln was saved. Dr, Marie Eugene Berjot, son of an influential member of Ihe first nation- al assembly of the French republic and odson of Gem Lafayette. died in New Orleans. The' Milton B. Itopkins university building at Kokomo. Ind., was burned Sunday. Loss. $45,000; insurance. $1l,- 000. It was a three-story brick build- ing., erected 45 years ago. At the opening of a new collere at Peresa-Argentina, near Turin, Ital3, Sunday, the great hall collapsed, car- rying down the asscmbty in he ruins. Three bishops were injured, one of whom has since died. Matt Drinkwater was fatally burned t the plate glass faetor.v in Kokomo, Ind. He was inside a boiJer cleaning it, when somebody turned steam in. [le was literally cooked, flesh dropping 3ff when the body ws removed. MILLION8 The Valuable Work of the Life- Saving Servic During tho Past Tw*Ive Months. REPOBI OF SUPEB!HIENgENT iMBALL, Out of 4,037 Persons ][avolvod in Wrecks nod Ace|denis ai ,Vh}eh the LIf ;aver Assisted. Only  w,,r L:mt, tnA Cargoo Va:ued at 7,163,390 were Stved.--They Saved 417 Vessels. Wmhin gton, Nov. 2.--The following is an abstract of the report of the gen- eral superintendent of the life-saviug service: At the close of lhe last fiscal year the establishment embraced 264 sta- tions, 192 being on the Atlantic, 56 on the lakes, 15 on the Pacific. and one at the falls of the Ohio, at Louisville, Ky. The ]York of the Life Savers. The number of disasters to docu- mented vessels within the field of op- erations at tim service during the year was 4(}2. There were on board these vessels 3,113 persons, of whom 12 were lest. The estimated va,ue of the ves- sels and cargoes involved was $7,168,- 390, Of this amount $5.410,530 was saved, and $757,860 lost; 663 ship- wrecked persons received succor at the stations. The number of vessels totally lost was 59. Other Cat tlaltles. In addi[ion to the forcgoing there were dnring the year 365 casna]ties to small craft, on board of which tht, re were 84 pei'sons, of whom l0 were lost; vah}e of the property involved, $1fi),705, of which $177.825 was saved. Fifty-six other persons were rescued who had falleu from wharves, piers, etc., the most of whom would have perishe.l bat for the aid of the life- saving crews. Nu tuber of Vcssols Saved. The crews saved, and assisted to save, durin the year, 47t vessels, val- ued with their cargoes, at $2.$68,655, and rendered assistancc of minor im- pOl'tance to 324 other vesscis in dis- tress, besides warning from danger by the signals of the potrol men 226 ves- sels. A ROW IN PROSPECT The Csc of Col. PIcqnart Taken Up In tk French Cha]nber of Deputies on Interpellation. Paris, Nov. 28.--The chamber of deputies was crowded, much interest being taken in the announced inteu- lion of some of the deputies to inter- pellate the government on the Pic- quart ease, M. Paul Deschanei, republican, an- nounced that lie had received a request to interpellate tbe government regard- ing the Picquart proceedings, and the premier, M. Dupuy, proposed an im- mediate discussion of the matter. M. Fourniele, socialist, asked for an ad- journment for an hour and a half. in order that the republican deputies might be able to consult with their colleagues in the senate regarding the adoption of a common policy. The chamber rejected the motion to adjourn by a vote of 252 to 244. CASE OF SENATOR QUAY ET AL, Attorney for the Defense Filed to Four Iudletments und Moved to uash the Fifth, Philadelphia, Nov. 28.--The case o Senator (uay and others, charged THE STORM STRUCK HER. with conspiracy in the misuse of the money of the state on deposit in the the Sts&mer Johu J. Hill Driven Ashore People's bank, came up in the court Near National Soldiers' Home Of quarter sessions, Judge Findletter, at (.nincy Mass. Quincy, )*lass., Nov. 28.The three- masted steamer which went ashore near the national sailors' home here. Sunday, is the steam- er John J. Hill. bound for Itills- bore, N. B.. from New York. She was anchored in the Nantucket roads when the storm struck her. She dragged her anchors and was gradual- ly driven before ihe terrific gale until she struck the shore. The steamer is now on shore and is apparently not damaged. The crew are safe. 3ONE TO THE PENITENTIARY. Seven Unltnd States Priaonetm ]gemoved from St. Louis to Jefferson City, Mo. St. Louis, Nov. 28.--United States Marshal Bohle. accompanied by a deputy, went to Jefferson City, Sun- day, with a batch of seveu prisoners recently convicted and sentenced in tbe federal court. Of the seven pris- oners all were convicted of counter- felting or passing counterfeit money, with the .xception of two. and one of these two was a post office burglar, and the robber of a post office for sol- diers at that. New Telegraph and Telephone Cables. San Francisco, Nov. 28.--A series of new telegraph and telephone cables are to be laid at ouce in the bay by tbe government. One of the lines is to stretch between Fort Mason on the north side of the bay to Angel island. then one will be laid to Alcatraz. The :Presidio and Fort taker are al:o to bn connected. ]rhe ]Illino Vote on Ihe ltanklng Las Ame<lmet. Springfield, Ill., Nov. 2S.--The offi- cial canvass of the vote on the ameud. meat of the banking law is completed in the secretary of mate's office. It shows 124,655 voting :[Of repeal, and 55,773 voting agailst, The vote in Cook crmnt" v,a 45,389 :for tal 15,74 presiding, The defendants were not in eour, their interest being looked after by Attorneys Rufus E. Shapley and A. S. L. Shields. Immediately upon the opening of court Attorney Shapley filed demurrers to four of the five i- dictments found against the" defend- ants by the grand jury and also filet[ a motion to quash the fifth indict, ment. Arguments on these de, murrers ws proceeded with. Upon conclusion of the arguments of Messrs. Shapley and Shields, and the reply of District Attorney Graham, the court took the papers under ad- visement. COUNT WILLIAM HOCKE. 8eerntary of the German Embassy at Wh- lngton Making a .Flyisg Trip Through the ]Vest. Chicago, Nov. 28,--Count Win, Itocke, secretary of the German em- bassy at Washington, arrived in Chi- cago on  flying trip through the west. Count Hocke bus been in the United States but four months, and bis trip is for the purpose of familiar- izing himself with the Country. :Re- garding the attitude of Germany on the Philippine question he said the emperor was not opposed to the Unit- ed States retaining the foothold it has gained in the far east, although sym- pathy was felt for Spain in the matter of compensation. "Our position has been much mis- represented," said he, "by the English press, which has sought to estrange the two countries, Germany and the United States have interests in com- mon. aud I hope the relations between the two nations will continue to be o the fricudlicst character." Fnow in Nebrltatka, Omaha. Neb., Nov. 28.--Snow has been falling the past 24 honrstbrough- out Nebraska. This, combined with the fall of iast week, leaves a heavy blanket over the stat The indiea NO. 25. FIRE AT KANSAS CITY. &lmot Total D0struetioa of Robert Kltll Co.'a i|lg IPurnituru Estnblishmt at ]kns City. l. Kansas City, Mo.. Nov. 2.--Fire in the bi furniture estab]i,hment of Robert Keith & Co., at Eleventh and Grand avenue, caused a los, o:[ stock roughly estimated at $150,000, The stock was insured for 80 per cent, of its valne. The building, ownSd by Dr. John Bryant. of Independence,wa amply protected. O , of the inlTer Etah"l'tmelt in till U'eat. The Keith house was one of the big- 'est of its kind in tbe west, nied a stock vahled at a qua.rter of million dollars. The building is seven stories in height, fronting 300 feet on Grand avenue, caused a Io o| on Eleventh street. The fire started at 4:20 a. m, on the top floor, was stored with nIattresses inflammable material. It fiercely.and was not gotten trol till seven o'clock. fifth and sixth floors were the remaining floors were soaked with water. The mos valuable portion Of the stock is on the water-soaked fl(mrs, and it is impossible to make an ac- curate estimate of the loss theron. A Narrow Ecpe, The nmmmoth retail dry of Emery, Bird. Thayer & Co., on north, was threatened for n but for the stillness of the atmosphere the fire would have communicated to that building. A later estimate places the loss oa  stock at from $200,000 to $210,090; in- surance, $1S5,000, NEWS FOR VOLUNTEERS. The News of It Peace Treaty ]lelog Signed ]VIII Result in tke Muster Oat of Moro Men, Washington, Nov. 2s.---The r de- partment, in view of the assurances that a peace treaty will be signed, i arranging to muster our more troops. - It is proimble that from 30.030 to 40,000 volunteers will be muslered out a soon :is selections of regiments can be made. There Las been quite a de- mand for the return of volunteers from Manila, but no troops Will i brought from the Philippines unless they are replaced by others, Many of the vohmteer regiments in Manil have asked, through the governors and congressmen of their states, to be turned to the United tates, hpt the : war department has not beeu able to make any definite promises pendi the peace negotiations. With the aa- ccptance of the American terms by th Spanish commissioners, any further possibilities of renewal of hostilitie with Spain is at an end, and the only + necessity for troops is to garrison t islands and preserve the peace of our new possessions. It is probable that the 30,000 or 40.000 meu now mustered + out will include a large number ganized for service in Cuba, force at Manila will be reduced ever Gen. Otis reports affairs in a quiet state iu the Philippines. BANKRUPTCY RULES. ['hey were Anoonnced In thu Unlttl ttt0S Supreme Court ThronEh Asso- elate Jastlce Gray. Vasbington, Nov. 28. The Un| States supreme court, through Justice ray, announced the new bankruptcy rules which it was authorized to frame and promulgate under the national baakruptcy act of July 1, 1898. The rules have been axaited with m'uch interest, as a number of courts de- cliued to proceed with bankruptcy ases until {he supreme court had - ouneed the new rules. + : Justice Gray nnounced that + new rules would take effect on Moa : day, January 2, 1899, and that all eeedings heretofore taken substantial- ly in conformity with the act and to th regulations of 1867 as far as prac- ticable would he npheld. The rules while promulgated at this time, he se, id; would ]tot be ready for disrib- tion for some time. owing to proof vision, etc. THE MAGOWAN HEARING. ":( ltae Court Awaiting InfmJtlon mum t.hl Aotlen of the 8umu IDiot at Washlugton. Erie, Pa., Nov. 28.--The F. A. MaGowan, Mrs, Gowan (Mrs. Wynn being aent in Toronto}, on the requisition granted Friday by Gay. Hastings, was called before Jmlge Walling, Ma,Gowa, n'a counsel fought bitterly for  contin, uance until next Friday, when the ha beas corpus case for posscssiou of th child will be heard, and also oR the ground that ex-Attoruey General ar- land would ask the United States an* preme cour at writ of habeas transfer all future proeeeding that court. Awaiting ington the case was adjourned 2:30 p. m. CAPTURED BY GAME WARDEN, YWe[ve Boxes of Nets, Four Tho ]Ponnds O@ Iatke Trout nnd TWO Prisoners Taken In. Grand lapids, Mich., Nov, 8,-- Deputy Fish and Game Brewster, wbo believed ers were violating the closed law, and has been cruising Michigan in tug, has Bea:yer island tug Cisco land, aecurini 12 boxes of net 4,000 pounds pf James Gatlagtaev, Left were taken priso.- outfit was brought here. Fonnfl Dead Ia led. Cape May, N. J,, Nov.