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The Woodville Republican
Woodville, Mississippi
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October 26, 1973     The Woodville Republican
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October 26, 1973
 

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Page 4 MISSISSIPPI OUTLOOK by Paul Pittman It is, in fact, a long way from Kemper coun,y, Mississippi, to Washington, D. C., yet John Stennis made that quantum leap, and in the process has distinguished himself as perhaps no Mlsstssippian has since L. Q. C. Lamar. His election to the U.S. Senate was a fragile thing to begin with. He won the seat under the a bizarre encounter with wo Washington, D.C., blacks in a robbery, his position has been ustained :by Pxesident Richard Nixon. Ntxcn, resisting a legal effort to release the now famous White House tapes, has agreed to have them reviewed and summarized by Senator Stennis. It is a con- sld:erable compliment to the old high-man-wins law in Mis-JSenator from Mississippi sissippl, following the death of I Now, what does the 'future Theodore G. Bilbo. l hold for John C. Stennis? He In that election, such political t i s 72. He has said In public that figures as former congressmen, I he will seek another term of Bill Colmer and John Rankin, and f:crmer governor, Paul B. Johnson, were contending. Yet, Stennis, playing on his Clrcuit Court judgeship base in the sixteenth judicial district, and the help of a broader base in the state extension service and a connection with R. D. Morrow, who at the time had close ties with the American Legion, managed to lead the ticket. Stennls promised in his cam- paign to "plow a straight fur- row." And, this he has done in t h e Mississippi agricultural idiom which places considerable stor Jin this particular char- acteristic. The real significance of the Stennis story is that he man- ' aged, somehow, during all the traumatic years of the state's xacial problems, to bridge the gap. He was able to hold on to l his supporters without playing the demagogue. AId, now, even more since he has sustained serious wounds in I,cffice. He has achieved a pin- nacle of influence in the Sen- ate, now serving as chairman of the armed services :commit- tee. There is reason to doubt that he will run again, but only time will resolve that issue. In the meantime, as always, there will be a cadre of ambitious men waiting in the wings. If the Senator runs. he will probably be unopposed. He is much admired in the Magnolia State. If he ,does not, y, ou can look for a political scramble ap- lCxoximating Grant's march to the sea. Perrytown News Mr. Ronnie Kilgarlin of Ba- ton Rouge was an overnight guest of his grandmother, Mrs. Hazel Hazlip, Tuesday. Mr. and Mrs. James Anders and children, Kathy, Del, and Russ, and Mr. Carrol Ray Huff of Natchez spent the day Sat- I CALF CREEP FEEDERS Heavy Duty All Steel e STOCK CHUTES PICKUP STOCK RACKS OILERS Aprons and Cable C. E .WARD, Jr. Phone 888-4678 Rt. 2, Box 770, Woodville, Mississippi Agent for DOLLY FARM EQUIPMENT CO., Inc. -WANTED- Handle Quality ASH, Cherry Bark OAK, and Tight or Lace Bark HICKORY. Highest Prices Paid Contact O. AMES COMPANY Phone 888-6431 Woodville, Miss. ,Let us help you get your new car ......... :v::.'?: ............................ t B.Jymg a new.car can be easier than you'd er>e,ct..if you Jet us handle the financirtg I) VOU. For All Your Insurance Needs and Auto Financing, See or Call PAT CAVIN 2 doors east of Postoffice SHIELD OF SHELTER Phone 888-6665 L ' - ' '''" The Woodville Republican, Woodville, Mississippi Rosetta News Mrs. James Livingston of Hammond, La., and Crosby vis- Ited her mother, Mrs. Bob Kel- ler, Monday. Mr. E. L. Forman, St., and Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Vines left on Thursday to visit ,his brother and sister-in-is,w, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Forman, in Rapid City, South Dakota, for a few days. Mr. Jesse Rymer of P, rairte- ville, La., and Mr. James Rymer and son, Lionel, ,of Natchez vts- [ited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Rymer, Saturday. Mrs. Tommle G. Sturdivant and Mrs. Judy MeG,raw and friends attended the Northeast- ern and Southeastern football game Saturday in Monroe, La. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Cowart of I Groves, Texas, are visiting Mrs. Grove,r Day. Bro. and Mrs. Bernard Waites and Mrs. Russell Smith attended the wedding of Mrs. Smith's granddaughter, Miss Carol Ada Smith, and Frank L. Selman, Jr., at Fairhope, Ala., the past week. Mrs. France Breedlove and Miss Darlene Speights visited Mrs. Jean Smith and Mrs. Marie Walters in Natchez Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Rymer of Centreville and Mr. and Mrs. William Rymer and children of Natchez visited their pareents, I Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Rymer, I Sunday. I Mr. and Mrs. Wade Brown I visited his brothex, Mr. Jim I Brown, in Meadville Hospital on I Sunday. ] Mrs. Inez Freeman of Vidalia, La., visited Mrs. France Breed- love Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Priest and children of St. Francisville vis- ited her mother, Mrs. Louise Day, Saturday. Mr. and Mns. Iverson Murray visited their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Havard, in Natchez Saturday. Mrs. E. L. Forman, Sr., re- turned home with Mrs. Ronald MeCabe and daughter, Kelly, to Alexandria, La., Friday for a visit. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brab- ham, Jr., and Mrs. Louise Day attended a birthday party Sun- day in St. lrancisville, La., for Melinda, heresa and, Robbte Priest, children of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Priest. En route they vis- ited Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Brab- ham, Sr., in Gloster. Mrs. Lloyd Fc,rman, Jr., and daughter, April, visited Mr. and Mrs. Richard, Sr., and Mr. and Mrs. Sonny Brown in Baton Rouge Monday until Thursday and visited Mr. and Mrs. Arbor Wlsner in Jackson, La., Friday. Wands, David and Earl Wis- her of Jackson, La., visited their uncle and aunt, Mr. and. Mrs. Lloyd Forman, Jr., for a few days, and Mrs. Grover Dover of Woodvllle was an overnight guest Sunday. Mr. Bobby L. Williams of Gon- zales, La., visited his aunt, Mrs. David Wayne Williams, Tues- day. Sincere sympathy is extended to the family of Mrs. Georgia Murray, who pased away last Sund, ay. urday with Mr. and Mrs. Jewel Anders and did some squirrel hunting. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Huff of Natchez visited their mother, Mrs. Emma Perry, Sunday. Visiting Mrs. Nin.a Sturdivan for the weekend were her chil- dren, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Sturdivant and .Joannie, Chip, and Ray, Mr. and Mrs. Ken[ Thompson and daughter, Miss I Cathy Cavln, Mr. and Mrs. I Mack Sturdivant 'and Little Annie and Chip, and Mr. Billy 8turdivant. all of Natchez, and Mrs. Virginia Cobb of Centxe- vllle. We send sympathy  the Murray family in the loss of their loved one Mrs. Georgia Murray, who passed away Sun- day in Field Memorial Hospital in Centrevllle and was buried in Rosetta Tuesday morning. We send get well wishes to Kavln Longmire, who is a pa- tient i,,] Field Hospital. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Davis Longmire. Guests of Mrs. Pearl Johnson last weekend were Mr. and Mrs. James Reeves of Crosby, Miss Joan' Reeves of Natchez, Mr. and Mrs. Davld Dixon of Delta State College, Cleveland, Mrs. Davis Longmire and Reid and Dawn of Gloster. and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Brown of Crosby. LOCALISMS (Con'tinued from Pae 1) Daylight Savings Time will of- ficially come to an end for 1973 at 2 a.m. on SUnday, OctOber 28. I We will thus gain b ak t2 extra ,hour of sleep we lost last i spring and can ook forward to earlier sunrises and Sunsets. We have been so advised be- fore and we guess we'll have to agree that our old mind does sometimes w o,r k back.wards, since for the life of us we have never figured out why the earlier clock setting would not work to better advantage for most during the short daylight hours ,of the winter months ,rather than the long days of summertime. Oh well, guess we're just out of step with too many of cur moder. innvations. And, speaking of modern in- novat!,n& we cannot fail to meention" in passing the Vet- erans Day holiday on Monday of this week, the second Monday holiday of the month and the second time this .month our production schedule has. been knocked awry by the lack of postal service on Monday. We don't know just how Armistice Day got moved from November llth to the fourth Monday in October, but we are sure the super-brains at the ape x of our federal bureaucracy had some good reason :fo,r the change. We kn:w this may not b3 the best way to win friends and influence ,people in certain quarters, but along this line we feel compelled to comment that we have never quite figured out either why we peons, t'he taxpayers, have to work on most of the myriad of modern "holidays" while the vast ma- j,ol'ity of the tax-paid employees take the day off! Maybe we're just jealou and a bit narrow- minded on this score. South Central Bell Seeks Rate Increase Citing the high and increas- ing costs of providing and ex- panding telephone service in a growing sate, South Central Bell last week asked the Missis- sippi 'Public Service Commission to approve higher telephone rates effective November 18. Local Manager Bob Hardy said that under the new rate sched- ule the local charge for bauic private-line resident service within the ba,e rate area of Woodvllle ,will be $5.71, up less than 5e a day. The new basic rate fc.r private-line business service will be $11.78. Hardy said the company's re- quest also includes increases in Friday,, October 26, 1973 charges for s.ome long dstance calls, in charges for installing or moving a telephone, and for several other miscellaneous serv- ices. The company is eeking high- e,r rates "because we have no other way to cover the increas- ing costs of providing our pres- ent and future customers with good telephone service," the lo- cal manager explained. "This will be only the second statewide general rate increase in 22 year&" Hrdy continued, "and in 1971 th'e increase that we got was less than two-.thirds the amount we requested and' needed. It wasn't enough even then. Since then, we, like everY- one else, have paid higher wages, higher prices for goods and services, ad higher costs for the capital we had to raise to meet unprecedented demand for telephone service. TIMBER SALE James M. Vardaman & Co., Inc., forest management specialists, solicits bids on 70,100 board feet pine sawtimber and 156,400 board feet hardwood sawtimber, Doyle Scale, on 232 acres in Section 8, Township 9 North, Range 5 East, Copiah County, and Section 7, Township 9 North, Range 5 East, Jefferson County, Mississippi. Sealed bids on a lump-sum basis must be received by James M. Vardaman & Co., Inc., P. O. Box 423, Brookhaven, Miss., not later than 10:00 a.m. on 6 November 1973. Write for prospectus or contact Joe A. Kuse, P. O. Box 423, Brookhaven, Miss., or call 833-8834. James M. Vardaman & Co., Inc., Standard Life Building, Jackson, Mississippi. Telephone number 601-354-3123. Branch Offices at Hottiesburg, Laurel, Brookhaven, Meridian, Bogalusa, Alexandria and Ruston, La. DEPOSIT GUARANTY NATIONAL BANK .STATEMENT OF COHDITIO00N SEPTEMBER 30, 1973 ASSETS Cash and due from banks ............... ...................... $116,954,895 U.S. Treasury securities ....................................... 54,229,442 Obligations of State and political subdivisions .................... 71,350,536 Other securities ............................................. 6,835,475 Federal funds sold ........................................... 47,700,000 Loans ...................................................... 419,249,052 Bank premises and equipment ................................. 12,146,652 Accrued income and other assets .............................. 8,981,246 TOTAL ASSETS .......................................... .8737447,298 CAPITAL ACCOUNTS Capital stock ............. ; .................................. Surplus ..................................................... U ndivided profits ............................................ Long term bills payable ....................................... TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS ............................... RESERVE FOR POSSIBLE LOAN LOSSES ...... , .............. LIABILITIES Deposits: Demand ................... . .............................. Time and savings .......................................... TOTAL DEPOSITS ...................................... . Federal funds purchased.. .................................... Accrued taxes and interest ................... ................. Unearned income and other liabilities ........................... TOTAL LIABILITI ES ...................................... TOTAL CAPITAL, RESERVES AND LIABILITIES .............. $ 10,481,625 34,518,375 1,716,686 5,060,000 51,776,686 6,978,377 287,895,455 331,632,894 619,528,349 42,025,000 5,008,086 12,130,800 678,692,235 73.7,447,298 CENTREVILLE OFFICERS Farmers Exchange Bank Donnie Nutt Vice President Mrs, Marian B. Lipscomb Branch Officer Michael L. Stewart Branch Ollier CENTREVILLE ADVISORY BOARD Mrs. E. B. Robinson, Chairman Charles N. Campbell Jack Q, Causey Joe D. Gordon Donnie Nutt William H. Smith William R. Trask BRANCH BANKS CENTREVILLE, FARMERS EXCHANGE BANK/CLINTON, BANK OF CLINTON GREENVILLE, GREENVILLE BANK/McCOMB, MECHANICS BANK MONTICELLO MONTICELLO BANK/NATCHEZ, CITY BANK & TRUST CO, NEWHEBRON, NEWHEBRON BANK FARMERS EXCHANGE BANK BRANCH OF DEPOSIT GUARANTY NATIONAL BANK GROW WITH US/CENTREVILLE, MISS./MEMBER F,D.I.O. ' i,, , . L,