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The Woodville Republican
Woodville, Mississippi
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August 31, 1973     The Woodville Republican
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August 31, 1973
 

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T i  MISSISSIPPI OUTLOOK i by Paul Pittman The state penitentiary, a cu- mulative problem out of long years of neglect, is now firmly tn the hands of the federal court, s. A case can be made for the fact that Gov. Bill Waller had a hand in stiffening Federal Judge Willlam Keady's deter- mination to improve conditions at Parchman. Tills is not to say that Mis- sissippi's penal farm is any worse tl]an the prison systems in surrounding states. In fact. though the state pris- on in Arkansas is cited as a model. Parchman is probably on a par with the pens in Louisi- ana and Alabama. Behind Judge Keady's hard- nosed attitude toward the Parchman situation is a mis- understanding over what the state would do to correct con- ditlons at the sprawling prison farm. Oov. Waller's response to Judge Keady's intervention in the case was described as a "snow job" to this reporter. In fact, there developed a broad gap between what the judge thought the state mould do to correct problems at the state pen and what Gov. Wailer said would be done. At any rate. the acting di- rector of the penitentia,ry, Wil- liam I. cBill) Hollowell. may be sitting on a powder keg. Al- though prisoners are relatively isolated in a number of camps over the 18.090 or more acres, the state penitentiary board has The Woodville Republican, Woodville, Mississ|ppt with paid civilian guards. Complicating the situation is the fact that State Senator Jmes Molpus of Clarksdale is known to want the director's Job. Molpus, a member of the state building commissLon, is in a po- sition o delay funds for con- struction and repairs at Parch- man. Whether he would do this, of course, is a matter of conjuc- lure. But a state grant to go with federal matching funds has, to date. not been forth- coming. Possibly, there is no simple answer to the Parchman situa- tion Some legislators think the penal farm should get out of the farming ,business. Others think the sate should sell the land and consolidate the camps into one major detention area. Still others feel that the camp system is ideal, avoidlng a con- had three penal experts to turn centration of some 2,000 inmates down the job of director, which might lead to a ri.ot. At Hollowell says that he does any rate. the state peniteniatry not want the job on a perma-l has go,on the headlines, in re- nent basis. Icon, ,weeks, making it a prob- In the meantime, there is allem difference of opinion about how i There probably is no simple the state pen should be solution other than the contin- oper-i uing attention of the peniten- ated. Officials have been ordered to ]tiary board and, in his case. the replace the rusty guard system federal courts. Make your last round decision. Ford Price-fighter Clearance H & R FORD, Inc., Woodville, Miss. WCTS NEWS The 1973 Wildoats football schedule will include the follow- ing game dates: Sept. 7 - Gloster, home Sept, 14 - Clinton La. home Sept. 21 - Port Gibson, there Sept. 27 - Utica, there Oct. 5 - Clinton. Ms.. home Oct. 12 Heidelberg, there Oct. 19 - Open Oct. 26 - Fayette. there Nov. 2 - Open Nov. 9 - Liberty, Homecoming Coaches for the Wildcats are Martin Williams and Alfred L. Wells. All students at WCTS will en- Joy their first Labor Day holi- day next Monday, September 3. However, classes will resume Tuesday morn,ins on schedule. We wish to thank the parents for their promptness in getting their children in school and we hope that every effort possible might be mde to keep each child in school daily, for better school attendance, as well as a more wholesome learning en- vironment. Wordy Hicks. Jr.. Principal. Local Ministers On Program Jehovah's Witness Convention Centrevllle One of the world's fastest growing minis- terial societies never "gradu- ates" its ministers. "Christian development never ends and the Christian minister can always advance in ministerial qualifi- cations. The official figures of last year showed 447 new min- isters were ordained each day world-wide," according to a spokesman for the Jehovah's Witnesses. For that reason the organiza- tion provides a continuous train- ing program of activity ,'or I young and old, A featured part] of that program is to be a two- day assembly of Jehovah's Wit- nesses, scheduled for September 1-2 in Mobile. Alabama. Local spokesman s Charles E. Davis, presiding minister of the Con- treville congregation. He and James B. Campbell, Jr., will be two of over 20 ministers who will participate on he program of 10 hours of Bible instruction. "The convention program in Mobile is really an extension of and a refresher for the regular training program conducted in all congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses," D a vi s explained. Some 1,500 Witnesses are ex- pected from Alabama and south central Mississippi for the two- ay convention Davis said. Local Student Receives Master's Degree In Ohio Bowling Green, Ohio -- Joe Ann Stewman Anderson of at. 4, Wooflville, received her master of arts degree from Bowling Green State University during the commencement exercises held there on August 25 She was one of 860 students who received degrees at the fall commencement exercises ,at the Ohio university. Graduates rep- resented 33 states and nine foreign countries. LOCALISMS (Continued from Page 1) adult volunteer leadership. If you are looking for a "once- a-year opportunity," if you would like to work with the youth of today, call the Middle Mississippi Girl Scout Council in Jackson, 366-8451. They will take it from there. 41 One of our ,fellow editors re- cently came up with a novel TO SERVE YOU BETTER $45 $4O $35 $30 $25 $2O Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 3"ul Aug Sep Oct Nov De  A typical Total Electric service bill could have variation: such as shown by the solid line. Payments on the Level Pay Plan (based on the sanle usage) would be similar to the dotted line. *The preccdi, t. ix a shnplified explanation of MP&L's rMer schedule RB.4, which has been attthorized by thdy constitated regulatory aathorily and states, "The customer's monthly use will be billed at the applicable rate anti his account debited in the It.S'ttttl mattner. The atnount st) determined will be adjusted so tl at the net amount payable j'or service itt the cttrrent month shall equal, to the nearest whole dollar, the average atttott,tt bilh, d to the ctl.vtomer under the applicable rate jbr tweh'e monttLe ending with the carrent month, plus or minas one-twelfth of the accumulated differ- ence betweett previoas monthly amoants debited and the prior statement# of net amounts payable fir monthly service under this plan." MP&L's "Level Pay Plan" helps you budget... and helps your peace of mind, too. People who live in Mississippi know the weather can vary a great deal hot in summer, cCd in winter. And when the weather fluctuates, so do certain monthly bills. The utility bill, for instance, lit cau go up in the summer when you need lots of air conditioning; up too ia the winter during the heating season. But in between, when you're using only the normal household appli:mcos, your electric bill may be considerably lower. Variation like that can put a strain on your budget and on your peace of mind, too. But many Mississippi Power & Light customers, whose service bills arc more than $120 a. year, avoid the uncertainty o[ "peaks and valleys" in their billing by taking advantage of. MP&L's Level Pay Plan. What is Level Pay? Simply put, the anaount you pay eacI month is approximately 1/12 of the amount payable hr service used in the 12 month period ending with the current month. Because usage of electricity varies from month to month, Level Pay cannot be based simply on a calendar year, instead it is an average amount derived from the 12 months preceding the month ]'or which you are billed.* Does it sound complicated? It isn't really. And if you're interested in the advantages the Level Pay Plan can mean for yaur budget arrangements, call your local office of MP&L. We will be glad to explain how Level Pay is another feature of MP&L that helps the Company to serve you better. I ]ISSlSSlPPl POWER & LIGHT 50 Year He/pin# Build Mississippi MIDDLE SOUTH UTILITIES SYSTEM Friday, Auaust 3 I, 1973 TOWN OF WOODVILLE BUDGET OF ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES For The Fiscal Year Ending September 30. 1974 Actual Budget GENERAL FUNDS Amounts Amounts General Revenue Fund Preceding for Ensuing Revenues Year Year Privilege Licenses .................................................... $ 1.800.00 $ 1.800.00 Permit's & Other Fees ............................................ 13.590.92 13.690.00 Police Fines .............................................................. 5.281.90 5.500.90 Miscellaneous ........................................................... 68.562.34 133.000.0{) Total from all sources other than t, axatlon .... $89.235.16 $153.900.00 Cash balance--beginning .................................... 82.517.38 25.000.90 Total call-, and revenue from sources other than taxation ........................................... $171.752.54 $178.900.90 Amount necessary to be raised by tax levy .... 19.732.60 20290.00 Total available cash & anticipated revenue from all sources .................................................. $191.485.14 $198.900.00 Expenditures Transfer to other Funds ........................................ $ 30.205.65 $ 25.900.00 Sunervision & Finance Salaries & Wazes .................................................... $ 29.194.95 $ 21.00.00 SupPlies & Expenses ............................................ 15.3230 1450.00 Eouiment ........................................................ 25.00 950.00 Total Supervision & winance ............................ $ 65.257.29 $ 60,750.00 Protection of Life & Property a, Police Deoartment Salaries & Wages .................................................... $ 19.802.89 $ 20.100.90 SuIplles & Expenses ............................................. 12.464.01 12.000.00 cluipment ................................................................ 333.17 400.90 Total Police Dept ................................................. $ 32.600.07 $ 32.500.00 b. Fire Department ,alaries & Wages .................................................... $ 408.00 $ 50000 ,qu.olies & Expenses ............................................ 1.172.97 1.00.00 Equipment ............................................................... 6.000.90 Total Fire Dept .................................................... $ 1.580.97 $ 7.500.90 Total Protection Life & Property .................... $ 34.181.04 $ 40.000.90 Care & Maintenance of Public Property Salaries & Wages .................................................... $ 8A58.38 $ 11.500.00 Supplies & Expenses ............................................ 591.03 500.{)0 Total Care & Main,. of Pub. ProDerty ............ $ 9.049.41 $ 12,900.90 Maintenance of Streets & Structures Salaries & Wages ................................................... $ 8.458.38 $ 11.500.90 Suoiie.s & Expenses ............................................ 47.479.85 45.000.00 Equipment ................................................................ 58l.{)0 1.000.90 Total Maintenance of Streets & Structures $ 56.519.23 $ 57.500.00 Public Health & Sanitation Salaries & Wages .................................................. $ 8A58.38 $ 11.500.09 Supplies & Expenses ............................................. 1.584.30 1.500.00 Equipment ................................................................ 150.90 150.00 Total Public Health & Sanitation , ................... $ 10.192.68 $ 13.150.00 Instructional & Recreational Supplies & Expenses ............................................ $ 10.357.86 $ 10.000.00 Total Instructional & Recreational ................ $ 10.357.86 $ 10.000.00 TOTAL ........................................................................ $185,557.42 $193.400.00 Public Utility Funds Water Works & Sewer Revenues Tran.sfer from other funds .................................. $ 20.208.00 Water Sales--Customers .................................... 46.614.97 47.000.00 Miscellaneous ............................................................ 77.859.85 1.400.90 Total from all sources other than taxation . $144.682.82 $ 48.4{)0.00 Cash balance--beginning .................................... 41.433.49 23,500.00 Total cash and revenue from sources other than taxation .......................................... $186,116.31 $ 71.900.00 Total available cash and anticiuated revenue from all sources $185.116.31 $ 71.900.00 Expenditures Transfer to other funds .................................... $ 3.000.00 $ 3,000.00 Salaries & Wages .................................................... 12.871.23 14.900.00 Supplies & Expenses ............................................ 24.526.64 15.900.00 Equipment ................................................................ 113.395.39 1.000.90 Total ............................................................................ $153,793.26 $ 33.000.00 Electric Utility & Gas Revenues Transfer from other fun'ds .,.......,.. .................. $ 30,205.65 $ 15,,00A}0 ,t Sales--Current to customers ................................ 92,570.09 115.000.00 Miscellaneous ............................................................ 46.526.07 46.500.90 (Total from all sources :other than taxation .. $169,301.81 $176 000.00 Cash balance--beginning .................................... 13.355.14 10:000.90 Total cash and revenue from sources other than taxation ......................................... $182,656.95 $186,500.00 Total available cash and anticipated revenue from all sources ................................................ $182,56.95 $186,500.00 Expenditures Salaries & Wages .................................................... $ 12.871.23 $ 20:000.00 Supplies & Expenses .............................................. 90.703.82 118.900.90 Equipment ................................................................ 550.00 1200.00 Total .......................................................................... $104.125.05 $139,000.00 BOND & INTEREST RETIREMENT FUND CWW&SS Bond Retirement & Reserve Fund Revenues Miscellaneous ........................................................ $ 3.000.00 Cash balancebeginning .................................... 5,136.25 8.136.25 Cash and revenue from sources other than taxation ..................................................... 8.136.25 8.136.25 Total available cash & anticipated revenue from all sources ................................................ $ 8,136.25 $ 8.136.25 Expenditures General .Issues Bond Redemption .................................................. $ 5,000.09 Interest Paid ............................................................ 900. '`){) Total ............................................................................ $ 5.900.00 This is to certify that the foregoing budget of estimated reve- nues and expenditures for the fiscal year ended Septembar 30 1973, is a true copy of the budget adopted in regular lneeting o the governing authorities of this municipality and as held on Aug. 7 as recorded on page 529 of minute book 8. Date Aug. 8. 1973 Frances Townsend, clerk ide which we feel has much merit. He pointed out that in his opinion the congress[onal franking or free-postage plan is Just exactly backwards. In- stead of giving our congressmen the privilege of writing us their glowing accounts of their many aceomplishments free of charge, why not reverse the .procedure and let the folks back home eJoy the privlege of sending postage-free letters to our na- tional solons. This, 'he says, would put things in their proper order, based on the alleged re- lationship between employers and hired help. He concludes with the observation: "We paY the lawmakers' wages; we picl hem for their jobs; our money subsidizes all postage franking; and we should be telling them insad of them telling us." We read somewhere recently that the word budget comes from the French word bougette, meaning small bag- which is what the American axpayer is left holding. LIVESTOCK SERVICE @ Livestock hauled to any auction barn or other destination of your choice at reasonable rates. order buying service. of stocker cattle bid on in Indiv!dual Quantities pasture. Other livestock services available on request. Contact O. K. FERGUSON Phon 888-6682 Woodville, Miss.