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The Woodville Republican
Woodville, Mississippi
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May 21, 2015     The Woodville Republican
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Page 6 The Woodville Republican, Thursday, May 21, 2015 i Tuscaloosa Mar tone Shale News No Rigs Drilling In The TMS On December 15, 2013, Encana spud the Lawson 25H-1 well using Trinidad Rig #124. This was the: first rig spud in the Tusca- loosa Marine Shale for a few months. On May 15, 2015, according to local reports, the Trinidad Rig #125 is making its move after completion of drilling the Bloomer #2H. To my knowledge there are no other rigs operating in the TMS for the present, ending a 17 month period where as many as 10 rigs were at work at one point in time. Rumors for some time have been that Sanchez would be drilling 2-4 wells in the Macedonia unit after the Bloomer was finished, but the Trinidad rig apparently won't be used. In fact, other rumors are that the Trinidad rigs mentioned above may be retired, and the crews work- ing on these rigs transferred to more modern rigs. These rumors go on to add that these modern rigs then may be assigned to the TMS at some point later this year by Encana. rm certainly hoping all this is true since these crews are familiar with is- sues here and can hit the ground running more quick- ly than new crews might. Despite the current ab- sence of a drilling rig, we still have an inventory of 10 wells ready to be fracked. As mentioned, Sanchez now has the Bloomer ready. Go- odrich Petroleum has 6 wells ready: Washington Parish, Painter Etal 5H-1 and W Alford 10H-1; Tangipahoa Parish, Kinchen 58H-1 and B-Nez 43H-1 and -2; Amite County, T. Lewis 7-38H-1. Halcon Resources also has 3 wells ready, Wilkinson Coun- ty, Creek Cottage West 1H, Rogers 1H; Tangipahoa Par- ash, Franklin PST Prop H-1. Based on past practices Sanchez wig schedule frack- ing the Bloomer pretty quick- ly. Goodrich has announced its intention to begin frack- ing its wells in June. I have not heard when Halcon might begin fracking. THE FAR CORNER Ft. Adams & Lake Mary by Rhonda b'L Quirk ARer the recent rain and high water, the Lake Mary Road is a sloppy mess. Folks have been working on re- pairs, but there is still much to be done. Planting time is here, and the condition of Lake Mary Road will make it difficult for farmers on both sides of the lake because the Mississippi River is on the rise again and Jackson Point could be cut off. The fickle river can make life beth chal- lenging and unpredictable, especially when your liveli- hood depends on her erratic nature. However, the read situation is also a constant threat. The combination of heavy rain and high water makes it almost impossible to even patch the read: How- ever, any assistance to im- prove our situation is greatly appreciated. The Jackson Point Read is in pretty fair shape consid- ering it has been underwater for about two months and it hasn't been graded or main- tained by the Second District by Rhonda Quirk in over two years. One of the key distinctions between Lake Road and Jack- son :Point  m culverts. Last private individu- : over 20 culverts on Jackson Point Road. The state purchased culverts for Lake Mary Road years ago but none have ever been in- stalled. Would culverts solve all of Lake Mary's problems? No. However, it could help with some of the drainage problems and washouts. ca] resident Mr. Sonny Huey spent the past couple of months trying to repair sev- eral washouts so folks could launch boats. Eresion Con- trol owner Kirk Smith pro- vided a tractor and fuel and, everyday, Mr. Huey worked on the same holes. Some folks wonder why not just stay out of the lake until the water goes down. That may seem logical to others but many folks depend on Lake Mary for their livelihood. There are at least four com- mercial fishermen who have to get into the,lake, and Lake Mary Planting Company and Loch Leven employees have to get to work. Many folks also need to check on f Early results from San- chez Morris 2H, located just west of Woodville in Wilkin- son County, wasn't good: 2,216 barrels of oil produced in the first 20 days from a 5,100 foot lateral. However, the explanation given dur- ing the 1st quarter report by Sanchez management was that the hole wasn't properly cleaned out prior to commencement of flow back. Plans are to allow the pres- sure from the hole to bleed down naturally before com- ing back in with a work over rig to properly clean it. The expectation is it will be the latter part of 2015 before pressure will reduce enough to allow for a work over rig. Since oil prices are still depressed, choking back the production from this well, whether intentionally or not, isn't necessarily a bad thing. If I were a mineral/ royalty owner, I'd be hoping the work over rig showed up simultaneously with $100+ oil prices. This story could certainly have a happy end- ingto it. As to other older wells, I am frequently asked to pro- vide an update on various specific ones. I would love to do that, but there simply isn't enough room for me to do so in this column. Once I have provided the initial results from a well, unless there is something unusual to occur, I haven't reported on the well again. To demonstrate my point I thought I'd give fall a gen- eral update on oil production here in the TMS to help you better understand why spe- citic wells aren't reported. If my figures are accxn-ate, as of March, 2015 there are 65 TMS wells located east of the Mississippi River that are listed as active producers, though 3 wells showed little or no production. By compa- ny. Encana -28; Goodrich -27; Halcon -6; Sanchez -3; Corn- stock -1. By county/parish: Amite County -31; Willdnson -18; Tangipahoa Parish -6; St. Helena-5; East Feliciana -3; West Feliciana -2. That's 49 Mississippi wells and 16 Louisiana wells. Production from these wells for March, 2015, to- taled 406,645 barrels of oil and an average of 13,117 barrels of oil per day. By county/parish: Amite -254,774; Wilkinson -99,509; Tangipahoa -35,974; St. Helena -5,757; East Felici- ana -5,624; West Feliciana -5,007. That's 354,283 bar- rels of oil from Mississippi and 52,362 from Louisiana. The top producer for March was Encana Mathis 29-17H-1 with 34,715 bar- rels of oil followed closely by Encana Longleaf 29H-2 ith 32,088 barrels. Both wells are in Amite County. Mathis began producing in February and Longleaf in March. ', Though there are no rigs operating here now, I'm con- fident it's not over. And, I'm goanna go out on a limb and say that 65 producers is only the beginning. Stay Tuned! Provide feedback for this column to bernellmcgehee@ gmail.com. tbe camps or want to take 2014An! Drinking Water Quality Report A,,.+ of fishin¢ in*h .... OIdrWatmAeaociation oacKwaer.  oeg e rJlere is. ' .... : April2015 a plan in process to repair Lake Mary Road, but as I empleesedtopresenttyouthisyeer.sAnnualQuOfityWaterReportTisrapOrtisdesignedtinfuabutthequsiiter have said in the past, noth- ing happens overnight. I do get agitated. Patience is not one of my strongest points, especially when many of the budget problems Wilkinson County faces couldhave been avoided. Audits not com- pleted in a timely manner resulting in no chance for state aid, thus leaving county responsibilities to private in- dividuals, and that is still common practice for folks in the second district. Sometimes days go by be- fore I can beat or drive to Loch Leven. I usually get to spend a couple days at home before the "water" alters my original plan and then it's back to the 'igh ground," until it is not so difficult to boat or drive in. (Continued on Page 10) 2014 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report -, Town of Centreville =,, PWa#: 0790003 May 2015 We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Qualify Water Report. Th report is designed to infomn you about the quality  and services we deliver to you avery day. Our constant goal is to Wovide you with a safe and de@satiable suPPly of ddnking water. We want you to undemtend the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment pmca and protect our water ressumes. We are committed Io ensudng the quality of your water. Our wster source is from wells draog from the Miocane Sedan er the Co41e Fun'halide Aquifem. The source water a-'=sessment has been coed for our puk:; water syatem to determine the overall susceptibility of its dnnking wat surely to identify potential soumes of co,lamination. A rogers contatntng detailed information on how the susceptibility determJnatidas were made has been furnished to our puic water system and is available for viewing upon re¢luest The wells for the Tow of Centreville have eeceivad lower tibitity rainga to contariltinn. If you have any questions about this rsport or  your water utility, please contact the Lany Lee at 601.645.5218. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility, If you want to Isem me, ple attend any of our regularly scheduisd meetings. They are held on the first Tueeday of the month It S:O0 PM It Town HI. We reutinaly motor for €on in your ¢innking wer seco"mg to Feder and Slate laws. Thin t.ab below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that we doftlKI during the period of Jatluery 1=TO [mlber 31  , 2014. ie Cases wtlera monitoring wasn't requited in 2014, the tabis reflects the most remt reeuRa. As water travels over the  Of  Or urmund, it dissolves naturally ocoumng minerals nd, in some cam, radiuecttve mete,late and' can pl( up eube or contaminants from the prseenoe of anime/ or fro human activity: mil contsminants, ouch as viruses and backma, that may come from sewage treatmenl plants, septic systems, agncaRural livestock operations, and wildlife; inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result frn ud:,an storm-water runoff, industrial, or dosetic wastawater discharges, oil end gee production, mining, or farming; peaticKtas and S, which may come f0m a veridty of sourcll such es agriculture, utben storm-watm" runoff, and residential uses; ogemc chemical contamlnsnts, iredibg synthat¢ and volatile Orgalo chemicals, which ere by-produCe of industrial processes and pat4eum production, end can also come from gas sirens and septic systems; radioactive contaminantS, which can be naturally Occurring or be the result of oil end gas pmducEon and mimng activities. In order to ensure that lap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that flmit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by !Jblic water systems. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents, II'S important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk, In Ibis table you will find many terms end abbreviations you might not be tsmilter with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the fotlowing definitions: Acton Level. the concentration of a contaminant which, if extruded, triggers treatment or other requirements wllh a water system must follow. Maximum Contsrninant Level (MCL). The "Maximum Allowed" (MCL) is ns highest level of s O:mtsminent that is allowed in drinlong watt. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best aveiisble trestont technology Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG). The "GoaF(MCLO) is the level of • contaminant in drinking water below which there is no knot or expected risk to health, MGLGi allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Rellual Disinfectem Level (MRDL) - The highest level of e di$intecta allowed in drinking water There is convin=ng evidence that addltioe Of s dllthfestant is nacogeary to control microbl contaminants. Maximum Residual Dis#flatten1 Level Go#J (MRDLG) - The level of • ddnking water disinfectant below vich there is no known or expected ,ink of health. MROLGa o not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control m;mbal contaminants. P#tts #or  (ppm) or Mil/tgrarr per liter (n - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000. PttS per billon (pb) or Mk:ogms per life,- one pert per billion ¢orreapo to one minute in 200Q years, or a a!ng ne v_/l...$10,000,G00. i TEST RESULTS v=--I--ts-;--F ,,,- ,.oat.=,or I Un .cLl ,Sou=com. I J / I MCIJACL I I I ..___J Inorganic Contaminants B. Amenlo N 2013" t NO mmw ppm nta 10 Erosion otnaturltoe)g; runoff from orrdls; runoff fForn glass i and ekoruc productn w= 2 2 Ischarge of driitk 9 wmtss; diarJnge from mad refmri; eta. Ion of natural dmim 100 100 Ouha kom mi Imd pulp milb i erosion Of natursi $ 1o to Run from tif= us; sasming t,=  feks, sm; amsidn o natumt depress 10 Barium N 2013" .4z No. : ' om .... :,:, .... ::. : 13. Chromium N 2013" 19. Nitrate (ss N 20t4 Nitrogen) Disinfection By-Products 82. TTHM N 2013" 1'.24 [Total ttihelornsthsnes] Cht0rine N 2014 1 [ N0 Rnge '" ppb 0 00 I By-pr0duct of drinking water chlorination .-t.t n 0 MOO/'4 w=taritiveutoo0ntrsi I, microbes Mosl recent sample, No sample required for 2014. As you can see by the table, our system bed n0 violations: We're toud that your drirWJ water .meets or exceeds all Federal and Stets requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been atected bowevaf the EPA h 0etsrminad thet your wer tS SAFE at these levels. We are required to monitor your drinking water for apectfic constituents on s monthly basis, Results of regular monitoring srs an indicator of whether or not our drinking water mee heh standards. In an effort to ensure systems camp!eta all monitoring requirements, MSDH now notifies systems of any missing samples prior to the end of the oemplienoe period If present, elevated levels of lead can cause eedous health problems, especaity for pregnant women and young children, Lead in drinking water is primarily from materiels and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Our water system is responsible for providing hJb quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used In plumbing comparents, When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for td exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are con,m,ed about lead in your water, you may wish to hve your water tested. Inlormation on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and ataps you can take to mirdmize exposure is available from the Safe Orinking Water Hotiine or at to://wwwepegov/sofevmter/!eed. The Mississippi State OeparWent of Health Public Health Laboratory offers lead testing. Rease contact 601,576.7582 if you wts to have your water tasted. All seumes of drifting water are subject TO potential contamination by substances that are naturally occurring or man ma0e. These subStances can be microbes, inorganic or organio chemicsts and radnactive substances. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to ¢0ntai at  small amounts of some conteminsnis The presence of contslnarYs does not nacesoerily indi th the watw" poses a health ri, More intomlatton abe contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Prolection Agency's Safe Drinking Watw Hotline at 1-80C-426-4791. .Sne people ny be more vulnerable to contaminants In drinking water than the general population, tmmuno-compromiSad gersuns such =s persons with cancar undergoing chemothery, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIVIAIDS or other immune • n Th sbould seek advice about drinki water a]mtem die,be,e, rome elderly, and mfantl can be particula at ntk from intecto s. ese beople - "rig from the health care providers. EPNCDC guidelines on alpro'iata msena to islsen the ,ilk of infection by cryptoapone=um and other mlcogat contaminants are avaifeble frn the Safe Drinking Water Hollies 1-800-428-4791. Town of Clmtravilfe works around the €lor.k to provide top quality wider to every tap. We ask thst ell our ¢tOr'Ntrs help us protect our water somcse, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children's future. and services we deitvor to you evmy day. Our constant goal is to provide you with • safe end dependsbfe suaply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to oontinuaily improve the water treatment process end protect our water resources. We am committed tO providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies, Our water source is from wells drawing from the Miocene Aquifer, We area pumhese water from the Town of Woodville. The aourca water assessment haa been complnted for OUr public water system to determine the overall suscapbbitity of its drinking water supply to identify poMntiat sources of €ontamination. A report containing detailed information on how the susceptibility determinations were made has been furnished to Our Public water system and Is available for viewing upon request. The wells for the Okl River Water Association have received lower renkinga in terms Of susceptibility to COntamination, If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Mm Peggy Ryan at 601.888.3782, We want our vlued custome to be informed about their water Utility. If you want to team more, please join us al arty of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the second Monday of each month at 4:30 PM at 610 Main Street, Woodvilte, MS 39669 We routinely monitor for ounatJtuerlts in your drinking water according to Federal and Slate laws,. This table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants that were detected during the pedod of January 1 = to December 31 = , 2014. In cases where monitoring wasn't reocuked in 2014. tl table reflects ffe most recent results. As water travels over the surface of land or underground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive materials and can pick up substances or contaminants from the presence of animals or from human antivity; microbial contaminants, SUCh 11 viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septk; systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife: inorgenfo contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally oocundng or result from urban atorm-water runoff, tnduatfiat, Or dement wastowafer discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming;  and ha,bidden, which may come from a vgrfety of soumes such as agriculture, urban storm-water mean, and reeider4iel uses; Organlc chemical contamints, inolung wnflti¢ and volatile organic chemicals, which are W-products of industrial processes and  Inductinn, and san also come from gas atons and septic systems; radioactive contaminants, which can be nure occurring or be the result of oil and 9as production and rntNng activities. In order to ensure that tap water ie safe to drink, EPA Iresoribes regtbens that limit the amount of captain €ontig'N4ntt In water provided by public water systems, AI! drmldng water, indudg bottiad drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contith at least small amounts Of some constituents. It's important TO remember that the prose,me of these conatRuenta dos not n:lssdly IndieAta that the water poses a health ask. In this table you will find many terms end abbreviations yOu might nor be familiar with, To help yOU better understand these tems we've provided the following definitions: Action Love/- the OlcMRratlon of a contaminant which, if exceeded, Idggem treatment or other requirements whiob a water system must follow. Maximum ConMmmant Level (MCL) - The 'Maximum Allowed" (MCL) is the highest level Of a contaminant that is allowed in ddnking water. MCLs are set as close tO the MCLGS as feasible using the best evadable treatment tachnoingy. Maximum Contana'nan Level Goal (MCLG) - The "GnaF(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in ddnking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for e margin Of faty. Maximum Residual Disnfeofant Level (MRDL) - The highest level of a ttisinfactont allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addlbon of a disinfectant is necessary TO control microbial contaminants, Maximum Re,sicluel Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - The level of S drinking water diatntectant below which there is r.Jo..lat [or ex4t, cted rJx Of health. MRDLGs do not refle the benefits Of the use Of allstate€tents to bunt,el microbial contaminants. Parts per rail#on (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (msI) - one part per million co$ponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10.000. Parts per billion (ppb) or Ivlcrogrern8 per liter - one port per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000. WS ID # 790005 TEST RESULTS [t I v'lo I, Col..Data [ Le'--I R='¢--'] U"T I MCLG IDa crSof SampleeE..ing l/Msum't II II MGL '[] Liksty$ource ofCo;lteminatton • , ........ MCACLRO / J __J_____ I Inorganic Contaminants 8. Amen N 2014 .g NO Rinse Ib n/a 10  Eresmn of natuat deposits: runoff from orchards; runoff gku;S and I t , eleotro as production wastes 10. Barium N 2014 .06 NO Range ppm 2 2 Didstge of df:".ng wastes; discharge fto metal rofdee; era, ion of normal dept t3. Cbromkml N 2014 4.3 No Range I 100 100 Dilcharge fmrn steel and pulp mllhl; erosion of natural deposits 14 Copper N 2010" .1 0 ppm 1.3 AL=I.3 Corrosn of household plumbing [ systems; ero=.on of natural fleoos eeohing from wood pmse,etlve 16. Fluodde N 2014 .132 No Range pflm 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits: ware, addflrm which promotes atrong teeth; [ diodes,go from ertdizer and aluminum fade,ion 17 Lead N 2010" t 0 ppb 0 "ALe15 Corrosion of heuseholcl pluming systems t erosion of natural deposits Disinfection By-Produ©ts ., TTHM N 2010" 4.23 NO gentile Ib O 80 By-produ of drinking water [Totat chlorination. tribelomathense] ChlOdns N 2014 1 ,3 12  0 MROL = 4 Watat additive used to conhol micr01x)s PWS ID # 790035 TEST RESULTS ..................... MCUACLUO I I .... 1.. I Inorganic Contaminants 10 Bs'ri'-m N 2014 14 Copper N 2010" to. Fluoride N 2014 .0B13 No Rsnge ,1 0 ,lay No Range t7. Lead N 2010" 3 0 pm Disinfection By, Products : e.. . =m, s  ,m,:: , rrHM N =0 sM ) No nge wb c N =04 .S .2 -,.1 , 2 2 Dfflchsrge of drilling wastes; d,charge ffmn metal refineries; erosion of nld:ursl deposits 1.3 AL=t .3 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural aposi; leeching from wand preservatives , , 4 4 Erosion of natural dpositS; water i additive whl promotes strong teeth: ! ¢lltshrge rrom fertilizer and i aluminum factories ALe15 Corrosion of household plumbing I s,'stamst erosion of natural deposits 0 60 By-Pe0¢ot of drinking water dtslnfoctlon 0 80 By.,product of drinking watsr chlorination. 0 MRDL - 4 Water ditive used to corttml micobse • ttosl recent saeqle. Ao soe requb, edfo 2014. AS you can zee by the table, our syem had no vIOUS. We're Ixou that your drinking vter meets or exceeds all Federal and tete rluiremente We have learned though our monitoring end testing that some constituents have been detacled however the EPA hse detormihed that your water IS AFE at these levels. We am required tO monitor your ddttking water for s[ cons,trusts n a monthly basis, Results of regular monitonng are an indicator of whether or not' our ddnklng water meets health standards. In an erred to ensure systems complete all monitoring requirements, MSDH now ,ratifies systems Of any missing samples prior TO the end of the compliance period. ff present, etavete levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young childra. Lead in drinking water is pdmadly from materials and components associated with  lines end home plumbing. Our water system is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of mate,tab used in plumbing components, When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potsnlial fur lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for ddnking or cooking, ff you are coernsd about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking wateL testing methods, and steps you ran take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www,epa.govhsafewate¢,.lead. The Mississippi Stele Department of Health Public Health Laberafow offers lead teng. Please contact 60t.578.7582 if you wish to have your water teated All sources of drinking water are imbjt TO potential contamination by aubtuns that ere naturally occurdng or man made. These substanoss can be microbes, inorganic Or organic chemicals and radioact,ve subltancas. All ddnking water, including bottled water, may reasonably ha expected to conbdn at least small amounts of tome contaminlnte, The presence of contaminenth does not necessarily indicate that the water poses e health k. More information about couteminante end potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EnvirOnmental Prate€ben Agency's Safe D¢inking Water Hatltne lit 1-800-426-4791. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in ddnldng water than Rta general population, Immune-€ompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemOtharaw, persona who have undergone oan tanspiants, people with HtV/AID$ or other immune system disorders, some elderly, end infants can be berticully at risk from inftlona. These people should seek advice about ddnldng water from their health Gore providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptoopoddium and other microbial cantonments are available from the d'- Drinking Water Hollies 1.800.426.4791. The Old River Water Association works around the crock to prowls top quality wets' to eveP tap, we ask that ell our cstomers help us protect OUr wer lourca, which are the haI of our community, our way of llfe and OUr children's future,